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Michael Conforti, 'Reflections on Teaching the History of Early Modern European Law, Crime, and Punishment to Undergraduates', 15-35

Article

Published onMay 01, 2014
Michael Conforti, 'Reflections on Teaching the History of Early Modern European Law, Crime, and Punishment to Undergraduates', 15-35

Abstract
Teaching the history of early modern European law and crime presents a number of possible obstacles to student learning. These include exposure to an unfamiliar historical narrative, encounters with different conceptions of social norms, deviancy, discipline, social control, illegality, and dispute resolution which are foreign to the experience of today’s students, and confrontations with complex legal ideas, vocabulary, writing conventions, and methods of analysis. In some institutions of higher learning, these challenges may be magnified by curricular requirements mandated by the institution itself. One way to overcome these potential impediments to student learning is to adopt teaching methods which incorporate insights derived from the scholarship of teaching and learning, particularly with reference to the concept of signature pedagogies. This article recounts one instructor’s continuing efforts to integrate effective pedagogical approaches identified by the scholarship of teaching and learning, as informed by the principles of pedagogy established within the historical tradition of the Society of Jesus, into a course on the history of early modern European law and crime.

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