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Jacky Bryon, 'The Uniqueness of Torquay: Government and Anti-Social Behaviour in the Early Nineteenth Century', 66-90

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Published onNov 01, 2013
Jacky Bryon, 'The Uniqueness of Torquay: Government and Anti-Social Behaviour in the Early Nineteenth Century', 66-90

Abstract
This article examines the uniqueness of Torquay and the ways in which the control of crime and anti-social behaviour were affected by the use of a Local Improvement Act, which was prescriptive in nature. This piece of legislation allowed the governing body to pursue policies which helped allowed those in authority to make improvements, preserve the social tone of the town and deal with issues of public order. Thus, in what was a fashionable seaside resort, controlling crime and regulating anti-social behaviour were important themes. In order to achieve their aims, the Commissioners used the summary courts to prosecute individuals for offences such as drunkenness, using abusive language and beating carpets in the streets, all with the intention of keeping order on the streets and making improvements.

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